Tag Archives: Milton Allimadi

The Deluge [4]

This is an illustration of Paul Kagame's criminal hands that Howard Buffet and Tony Blair are avoiding to consider in their advocacy for the dictator so their business interests continue to flourish in the region, at the expense of millions of Congolese, hundreds of thousands of raped women, Rwandans, and others, for almost 20 years now.

This is an illustration of Paul Kagame’s criminal hands that investor Howard Buffet, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, and other lobby groups have been avoiding to consider in their advocacy for the Rwandan dictator so their business interests continue to flourish in the region, at the expense of millions of Congolese, hundreds of thousands of raped women, Rwandans, and others, for almost 20 years now.

The Deluge is the title of a film  in preparation by the investigative journalist Keith Harmon Snow. It focuses on the myths and realities of genocide in Central Africa. The producer is looking for financial contributions to finalize the project. To make the public understand more the issues at stake in the film, we have decided to publish scripts of short interviews or extracts of speeches of some identifiable people who are shown in the film. In this fourth note, we have five people: Charles Onana, investigative journalist and Rwanda scholar, Dr Jean Marie Vianney Higiro, former head of Rwanda Information Office, Milton Allimadi, Founder publisher “The Black Star News,” Henry Gombya, exiled Ugandan, editor of the London Evening News, Dr Amii Omara Otumu, UNESCO human rights chair.  Continue reading

Advertisements

The Deluge [2]

Since the 80s the Great Lakes region has experiences genocides, war crimes, crimes against humanity, so much so that the entire area has become like a cemetery. There are human skeletons everywhere, some more respected than others.

Since the 80s the Great Lakes region has experiences genocides, war crimes, crimes against humanity, so much so that the entire area has become like a cemetery. There are human skeletons everywhere, some more respected than others.

The Deluge is the title of a film  in preparation by the investigative journalist Keith Harmon Snow. It focuses on the myths and realities of genocide in Central Africa. The producer is looking for financial contributions to finalize the project. To make the public understand more the issues at stake in the film, we have decided to publish scripts of short interviews or extracts of speeches of some identifiable people who are shown in the film. In this second note, we have six people: Tutsi prince Antoine Theophile Nyetera, Milton Allimadi, founder and publisher of “The Black Star News”, Professor Noam Chomsky, Susan Thompson, Rwanda genocide scholar [persona non grata in Rwanda], Dr. Jean Marie Vianney Higiro, former head of Rwanda Information Office, Faustin Twagiramungu, former Rwandan Prime Minister under Kagame. Continue reading

DRC: getting a grip to cast the first stone

By Felicite Nduku

The author of this note read Patrick Mbeko’s reflection also posted on this blog on how the latter understands the problem that Africans who consider the West as their savior have. Mbeko focuses primarily his analysis on the situation in his native Democratic Republic of Congo. But his arguments can be easily applied to the entire African continent. Felicite Nduku, who is also Congolese, reflects back to give the reader an interesting imagery of what has been happening in DRC, comparing it to the condition of a troubled family which requires outside help.  Continue reading

China: US malicious worries for Africa

A while ago I came across a book of which title was ‘If China had discovered America’.

One plausible hypothesis from that would be for example that instead of writing these lines in English and from London I would possibly be doing that in Chinese and based somewhere in China.

The global metropolis the world would be attracted to would be Beijing, Guangzhou or Shanghai and not Paris, New York or Rome.

Of course, most of the street signs we read in English in the Anglo-Saxon countries would be mainly if not all written in Chinese.

A recent surprise though was to see in London buses covered with ads written only in Chinese without any English word to tell people what these unusual signs meant apart from like pointing to the British public on such script as ‘We are Chinese. We have landed.’ Continue reading