Category Archives: Leaders

Our deepest condolences to the great people of Ghana

All true sons and sisters of Africa and friends of Ghana all over the world mourn the sudden death of President John Evans Atta Mills on Tuesday July 24th, 2012.

At the same time, they praise the peaceful transition that occurred on the same day by getting sworn in as 4th President of 4thRepublic of Ghana, his Excellency the incumbent vice-president John Dramani Mahama

This should be another example of hope for the continent of seeing strong institutions prevailing against strong personalities.

Video – John Dramani Mahama sworn in

Long Live Ghana
Long Live Africa

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Obama dilemma on Eastern Congo

He did not create directly the ongoing instability in Eastern Congo. He only inherited the situation.

But US institutions and private interests are widely seen as responsible through the country overall foreign policy towards the region.

Can he change it? Yes he can. Though there are challenges. And that’s where Barack Obama, US president, is faced with a tricky dilemma.

Like his predecessors, he is by constitution the first American citizen whose mandatory responsibility is mainly to defend US as a country and its people’s interests. Continue reading

The question of true African independence

At the occasion of celebrating the 50th independence anniversary of three African countries: Burundi, Rwanda, and Somali, which occurred on Saturday 1st July, AWIP radio programme talked to Africans who are active on issues prevailing on their continent. Ambrose Nzeyimana who is from Rwanda but lives in UK answered for the listeners of the programme, the following questions, which focus on the issue of true African independence. This is an edited version of the live interview led by Rema Diallo which was aired on Tuesday evening 3rd July, 2012 on GFM. Continue reading

Enlightened citizens are challenging African leaders’ incompetence through Twitter

Professor Ayittey

As the world speedily embraces new platforms for communication, directness and power of the latter provide exceptional possibilities of transforming African political leadership.

The following note, which is part of Professor Ayittey’s reaction to the President of Nideria, Goodluck Ebele Jonathan, was published online by Sahara Reporters. It is an illustration of the feeding of a constructive debate into conservative thinking on issues of national and public interest. Continue reading

Call to shame Abdoulaye Wade, Senegalese president

Something must be seriously wrong with some African leaders, particularly when they are approaching the end of their second term in power. Abdoulaye Wade, president of Senegal, 85, made me raise such issue.

Professor Horace Campbell explains Wade political hypocrisy in an article published on Pambazuka News site.

“At the 2007 conference of the African Union, Wade said, ‘If we fail to unite, we will become weak, and if we live isolated in countries that are divided, we face the risk of collapsing in the face of stronger and united economies.’ If you meant these words, step down now.” 

In recent years, the Senegalese president’s behavior has weakened his country’s stand among Africans as a model of democracy. By changing the democratic principles on which Senegal was so far built, Wade is isolating and making it look like a rogue state.

President Wade, by seeking a third term, though he had been an ardent advocate of peaceful political change, has put shame on the role that his country played in the eyes of many Africans.