Monthly Archives: December 2013

Academics affirm Kagame’s tactical action to sacrifice Tutsi in 1994 to gain power

Since the 80s the Great Lakes region has experienced genocides, war crimes, crimes against humanity, so much so that the entire area has become like a cemetery with dead on display. There are human skeletons everywhere, some more respected than others.

Since the 80s the Great Lakes region has experienced genocides, war crimes, crimes against humanity, so much so that the entire area has become like a cemetery with dead on display. There are human skeletons everywhere, some more respected than others. Photo courtesy of keith harmon snow, 2006.

Photo courtesy of keith harmon snow, 2006.

Photo courtesy of keith harmon snow, 2006.

Christian Davenport, Allan C. Stam and Andre Guichaoua are not the only ones to claim that Kagame used the killing of Tutsis by his infiltrated militia, his soldiers, and Hutu interahamwe to access political power in Rwanda. RuzibizaAbdul Joshua in his book – Rwanda: la guerre secrete [Panama, 2005], and Jean Marie Ndagijimana, author of How Paul Kagame deliberately sacrificed the Tutsis [Paris, 2009] support that view. And they are a few out of many witnesses and analysts who confirm such understanding of the Rwandan genocide. The following extract from the book of Patrick MbekoLe Canada dans les guerres en Afrique Centrale, [page 495] indicate what Christian Davenport, Allan C. Stam and Andre Guichaoua explain about Kagame’s attitude towards Tutsis who had remained in Rwanda and why he got them killed and somehow deliberately avoided saving them. Continue reading

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Why Africans Should Celebrate Thomas Sankara

By Michael Mungai

“The recent sensation about Joseph Kony should be a lesson to all Africans that if we don’t select the narratives that we would like to universalize, someone else will. And we won’t like it.”

Thomas Sankara, the charismatic and pan-Africanist Burkinabe leader.

Thomas Sankara, the charismatic and pan-Africanist Burkinabe leader.

True heroes of Africa often lie in unmarked graves. Their achievements are only celebrated by a minority of dissidents who are sparsely located around the continent and throughout its diaspora. Stifled by the fabricated feats of the African neo-colonialist aristocracy, the legacy left by our unsung heroes is more endangered than the mountain gorilla.

The African press expediently exhumes their contributions during national holidays, only to bury them again once the celebrations are over. The global media is fixated on despots and warlords. The recent sensation about Joseph Kony should be a lesson to all Africans that if we don’t select the narratives that we would like to universalize, someone else will. And we won’t like it. Continue reading

Video

Human intelligence and race: an enlightening documentary

Rageh Omar:

“…IQ tests are not a measure of innate intelligence. They are a reflection of how you were brought up, testing if your parents gave you toys designed to prepare you to succeed in the modern world.

We have to change the culture if we want to change the status quo…

…Confucius seems to live on in East Asia achievements… with their students’ achievements written in gold on temples’ walls…

I think this is the way to close any race gap…

It is important that all the children have access to the same aspirations…”

Video

Congolese awakening: Paris, December 21st, 2013 [remember why they died]

They made it look like the American civil rights movement of the 60s. At that time, they were people of colour marching in many US cities claiming equality of races in the American society.

On Saturday December 21st, 2013 in Paris, they were Congolese. They came from everywhere: United Kingdom, France, Brazil, Canada, Ireland, Nigeria, Russia, Venezuela, Switzerland, Spain, Belgium, Holland, Sweden, etc.

According to certain sources they were between 5,000 and 7,000 people. They were almost all Congolese with only few faces which did look alien to the demographics of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The purpose of the meeting of Paris was to say NO to a concert by the Congolese artist JB Mpiana. However, a few days before, the event had been cancelled by the French authorities preoccupied by security issues.

Understandably, all the people who had planned to attend the Paris meeting were already gearing to the event. Some had already arrived in the French capital before the official cancellation of the concert.

The question any non-informed observer would ask is why a musical concert would be so vigorously controversial. The answer is to be found in the politics of the Congolese government in Kinshasa and the place that music holds in that country.

It appears that the music, because of its significant part in the Congolese society, is used by politicians to distract the population from asking accountability about national critical issues such as persistent war in Eastern Congo, poverty, injustices, lack of essential infrastructures including schools and hospitals.

For the many Congolese who gathered in Paris, the purpose of the public march and meeting was to tell to their government in Kinshasa that it had proven its total incompetence in addressing the challenges faced by their country, and especially the problem of protecting DRC sovereignty.

In the same line of Congolese awakening, on December 23rd, 2013 the French president, Francois Hollande, received the petitioners for an International Criminal Tribunal for the DR Congo.

While Congolese consciousness is getting a significant momentum among citizens of DRC, it is unfortunately at the same period we witness other conflicts emerging across Africa. We observe almost helplessly what is happening in the Central Republic of Africa or South Sudan. Before, it was in Mali, Ivory Coast and Libya.

Can Africans wherever they are across the world or live in these states created by Europeans in Africa see in these different zones of conflicts, potential sources of their additional problems for their ultimate development and seek solutions together? They should feel as much concerned as neighbors are when a house in the neighborhood gets on fire.

Related links:
1. Souvenez-vous pourquoi nous sommes morts…
2. Possibility of an international criminal tribunal court for the Democratic Republic of Congo
3. “Les combattants” from Sweden in Paris: Congo Moko

Are UN peacekeeping operations causing more instability than they are resolving in Africa?

By Bosco Mutarambirwa

Congolese protesters on November 28th, 2012 in front of the Rwandan High Commission in London - UK.

Congolese protesters on November 28th, 2012 in front of the Rwandan High Commission in London – UK.

One may reasonably argue that Rwanda, Uganda, and any of those poor African countries contributing UN peacekeepers may have no interest in peace around the continent.

It may seem absurd, but based on the current financing structure of UN Peacekeeping operations; these poor countries have a lot of financial incentives to create instability within Africa so that they can send in their “peacekeeping” troops and make some much needed cash. Continue reading