Monthly Archives: April 2013

He did not stop it, but he instead started it.

Kigali Memorial Centre

Kigali Memorial Centre

The majority of Rwandans know well that their president Paul Kagame is responsible of the genocide against Tutsis. To claim that he stopped it is not only a lie but also a serious insult to the memory of its victims.

I reproduce below an analysis of significant facts done in 2007 by Guillaume Murere, Ph.D., regarding what happened at the time.

It is not the number of times a lie is repeated that transforms the facts engraved in stone on the canvas of history, as long as the latter is objectively viewed. Continue reading

Patrice Motsepe: The spirit of Ubuntu at work

Patrice Motsepe - South African richest black man.

Patrice Motsepe – South African richest black man.

Economies that are growing and have ethical and accountable political, business and other leaders are better positioned and substantially more effective in dealing with poverty, joblessness, illiteracy and disease.” Patrice Motsepe.

He is South Africa’s richest black man ready to give $1.3 billion, half his wealth, to the poor. Continue reading

Recommendations of the International Conference on Rwandan refugees held in Brussels, Belgium, on 19 and 20 April 2013

Rwandan refugees from Tanzania returning home in 2006 - Photo by NewTimes.

Rwandan refugees from Tanzania returning home in 2006 – Photo by NewTimes.

The International Conference on Rwandan refugees (hereinafter referred to as: The Conference) held in Brussels, Belgium, on the 19 and 20 April 2013;

Having considered the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (hereinafter referred to as ‘1951 Convention’), specifically article 1 C (5) and (6) dealing with the cessation of refugee status (clauses on “ceased circumstances”);

Having considered the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, particularly article II dealing with cooperation between the national authorities and the United Nations; Continue reading

Rwanda: When RPF youth indoctrination competes only with Communist or Nazi youth programs.

Hundreds of young adults and minors arrested for petty crimes ranging from being homeless to not having an identification card. By JEFFREY Gettleman - 30/04/10 NYTimes "Rwanda pursues dissenters and the homeless.

Hundreds of Rwandan young adults and minors arrested for petty crimes ranging from being homeless to not having an identification card. By JEFFREY Gettleman – 30/04/10 NYTimes “Rwanda pursues dissenters and the homeless.

Were Russians of Lenin or Stalin eras coerced into being “good” communist citizens? Undoubtedly so. And there were national programmes that authorities in the Kremlin used to have complying people ready to sustain the system as long as possible.

The Rwandan president Paul Kagame and his Rwandan Patriotic Front [RPF] are at work since 1994 creating a society which can compete well with many authoritarian regimes of the recent pass of before the end of the Cold War.

A brief report that Global Campaign for Rwandan’s Human Rights [GCRHR] published in April 2013 demonstrates how the RPF government forcibly enrolls and trains young people nationally with an ultimate aim of making its oppressive and discriminatory policies last longer. Continue reading

When the River Congo is seen as bad but the River Thames as good

 

Chinua Achebe, Nigerian novelist of international stature. [1930 - 2013]

Chinua Achebe, Nigerian novelist of international stature. [1930 – 2013]

This is an analysis of Chinua Achebe, the recently deceased Nigerian novelist, that he makes referring to the portrayal of Africa by Joseph Conrad in his book Heart of Darkness published in 1899. The following is an essay that the African writer did to highlight the supremacist attitude that the English author of the 19th century expresses towards Africa and its people. Achebe reflected on that particular novel because of the significant impact it did to mold the Western thinking about the African continent.

Heart of Darkness, An Authoritative Text, background and Sources Criticism. 1961. 3rd ed. Ed. Robert Kimbrough, London: W. W Norton and Co., 1988, pp.251-261

In the fall of 1974 I was walking one day from the English Department at the University of Massachusetts to a parking lot. It was a fine autumn morning such as encouraged friendliness to passing strangers. Brisk youngsters were hurrying in all directions, many of them obviously freshmen in their first flush of enthusiasm. An older man going the same way as I turned and remarked to me how very young they came these days. I agreed. Then he asked me if I was a student too. I said no, I was a teacher. What did I teach? African literature. Now that was funny, he said, because he knew a fellow who taught the same thing, or perhaps it was African history, in a certain Community College not far from here. It always surprised him, he went on to say, because he never had thought of Africa as having that kind of stuff, you know. By this time I was walking much faster. “Oh well,” I heard him say finally, behind me: “I guess I have to take your course to find out.” A few weeks later I received two very touching letters from high school children in Yonkers, New York, who — bless their teacher — had just read Things Fall Apart. One of them was particularly happy to learn about the customs and superstitions of an African tribe.

I propose to draw from these rather trivial encounters rather heavy conclusions which at first sight might seem somewhat out of proportion to them. But only, I hope, at first sight.

The young fellow from Yonkers, perhaps partly on account of his age but I believe also for much deeper and more serious reasons, is obviously unaware that the life of his own tribesmen in Yonkers, New York, is full of odd customs and superstitions and, like everybody else in his culture, imagines that he needs a trip to Africa to encounter those things. Continue reading