Monthly Archives: January 2013

Troubling developments in the Great Lakes region

By Eric Kashambuzi  

African Great Lakes Region

African Great Lakes Region

“…Hutu people continue to be condemned for problems in the region. By and large, Hutu have been more victims than perpetrators of conflict. It is the Tutsi people since they met Bantu Hutu in the region in the 15th century that caused instability and insecurity, not Hutus. Unless Tutsi culture of violence with impunity is uprooted, the region won’t enjoy peace in many years hence. A permanent mechanism needs to be put in place so that another M23 doesn’t emerge.”  Continue reading

Matt Forest calls Paul Kagame a big liar

Rwandan president Paul Kagame - Time picture

Rwandan president Paul Kagame – Time picture

I am reproducing here a comment that Mark Forest wrote after reading and watching CNN presenter Christine Amanpour’s interview of Paul Kagame.One of the focuses of the exchange between the journalist and the Rwandan president is when he intends to step down. Continue reading

Rwanda: Paul Kagame says NO to leaving power in 2017

Amanpour asked if that meant “yes,” he would step down.

He replied, “No. It is a broad answer to say you don’t need to worry about anything.”

Spanish protest against the presence of Paul Kagame in Spain back in 2010.

Spanish protest against the presence of Paul Kagame in Spain back in 2010.

On the supposed 52nd anniversary of the Rwandan Democracy Day, the Rwandan President Paul Kagame hints to Amanpour, CNN presenter that he will not leave power in 2017. 

Being a dictatorship which claims to be democratic, the RPF regime has removed from official celebrations the remembrance of the day when Rwandans back in the 1960s came together to acknowledge the benefit of choosing their rulers for the first time in their history.

On January 28th, 1961 Rwanda celebrated the outcome of a popular referendum which months before had seen the country ending the monarchy rule and elected its people’s local representatives.

Under the RPF rule, not only has the Rwandan President silenced any critical voice of its numerous damageable policies, but it does neither appear ready at all to give room to any democratic expression of citizens in the short or medium term.

Please watch and listen to Paul Kagame’s interview with CNN journalist Amanpour by clicking here. 

For those in the Rwandan political opposition, from now they need to know. He [President Paul Kagame] is not going anywhere. He is not willing to leave office when his current term ends.They should align their strategies accordingly. To remove RPF from power they must force out its president. 

 

 

 

 

 

Africa needs thousands of Lumumba

Original caption: 12/2/1960- Leopoldville, Congo- Former Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba, (right), his hands tied behind his back and without his glasses, is taken to jail after his arrest and return to Leopoldville. Troops of Colonel Mobutu seized Lumumba at the Port of Francqui. Another prisoner, Joseph Okito, former vice president of the Senate, is on the left. Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Original caption: 12/2/1960- Leopoldville, Congo- Former Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba, (right), his hands tied behind his back and without his glasses, is taken to jail after his arrest and return to Leopoldville. Troops of Colonel Mobutu seized Lumumba at the Port of Francqui. Another prisoner, Joseph Okito, former vice president of the Senate, is on the left. Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Africa is not poor, but Africa is looted.” Likay Lokongo

Africa is everything else except being a charity case.” Likay Lokongo

Our today’s heroes are defined for us by mainstream media [look at people like Jay-Z, Beyonce and many others as role models for our youth, when more than 6 millions of Congolese die and hundreds of thousands of their women and girls are raped.]” Likay Lokongo

These are some of the quotes from speakers who presented different topics at the occasion of remembering the Congolese national hero Patrice Lumumba on Thursday 18/1/13 at SOAS – London.  Continue reading

Ghana’s tears, 30 years on

By Prince Ofori-Atta

Ghana - UN picture

Ghana – UN picture

There is one year Ghanaians won’t mind blotting out of history. A severe dry spell and bush fires resulted in a grim famine in the country. But that was only the beginning of 1983.

The Nigerian Aliens Expulsion Order of late January sent home some 1.5 million migrants, mostly from West African neighbours Ghana, Niger and Benin. Countless numbers of people were sent back to Ghana on frighteningly overloaded ships amid harrowing tales of some returnees plunging to their deaths on high seas due to lack of space. Continue reading