Congolese demand an International Criminal Court for Congo

Western taxpayers must wake up and ask questions to their politicians how they are using their money when it comes to countries like Rwanda and Uganda which have been waging wars in Central Africa region where more than 8 million people have died in the last two decades while Washington and London particularly knew what was going on.

Frank Le Fever picture – Western taxpayers must wake up and ask questions to their politicians on how they are using their money when it comes to countries like Rwanda and Uganda which have been waging wars in Central Africa region, where more than 8 million people have died in the last two decades while Washington and London particularly knew what was going on.

When war criminals rule countries and are allowed to, the world of the indifferent people should not be surprised of the consequences. But when good people stand up and say that impunity must stop, it must end whatever how long it takes to get to such objective.

In 2010 when the UN Mapping report was published we were on this blog and through other initiatives the first concerned people highlighting the importance of having an International Criminal Tribunal Court for Congo.

This report was one of many which have been produced and continue to be on the same issue of crimes being committed in the Great Lakes region, and particularly in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

That the same call for an International Criminal Tribunal for Congo be today heard from different voices comes as an acknowledgement of the pertinence of impunity in whatever is going on regarding the Congolese crisis.

Frank Le Fever, an American retired scientist and advocate of victims of wars perpetrated in the Great Lakes region with significant support of the US government asked Ambassador Rapp on December 4th, 2012 this question:

There is a lot of attention lately to the M23 militia rampaging in Congo. There was a very similar militia that invaded Rwanda in 1990, and killed thousands between then and 1994, did a lot of the killing during that period and continued afterwards, killing refugees, then invading Congo to kill more. They were never brought to trial. It was ‘victor’s justice and the losers were unable to indict anybody. If they had been put on trial, do you think we’ve been having the problems we’re having with M23 now?  

To protest against persistent indifference of the international community [US, UK, other Western countries and their multinationals] in the face of the Congolese situation, the Rassemblement National Congolais started a hunger strike on December 1st, 2012 in Paris.

Charles Onana, Cameroonian journalist and author, at the recent launch of his last book “Europe, Crimes et Censure au Congo” on November 29th, 2012 in which he focuses on the significant responsibility of the European Union on what the DRC has been experiencing for almost two decades, he requested from Congolese, particularly “Les Combattants” and other concerned patriots of the country of Lumumba, to continue mobilising, mobilising and mobilising until the tragedy ends and a new Congo emerges.

And Milton Allimadi, Editor of Black Star News to say:

 “We must all do all we can for the children and women of Congo…”

An end to impunity for Rwandan, Ugandan and Congolese leaders has to be the focus of those deeply interested in seeing peace and prosperity in DRC and the Great Lakes region. Such focus appears unfortunately to be different from those in Kampala, Kigali, Kinshasa, London, Washington and elsewhere, whose Congolese’ death toll by the recurring tragedy seems not yet enough.

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