Patrick Mbeko reacts on ICC sentencing of Charles Taylor

As a committed activist for issues pertaining his native Democratic Republic of Congo, Patrick Mbeko, who lives in Canada and has recently published in French a book highlighting the role of that country in ongoing wars that have been ravaging the whole Central African region, does not miss opportunities to provide his views on other significant aspects that affect Africa. The following note that I took the freedom of translating from French was featured on his Facebook pages. It points on his understanding of the sentencing of Charles Taylor, the former Liberian president.

I received a message from a fellow compatriot who, reacting to my position on the sentencing of Mr. Charles Taylor [conviction that I denounce], asked me why I tend to defend African dictators such as Muammar Qaddafi and Charles Taylor?

I understand this concerned compatriot and he is not the first person to make that point.

But here is my argument: first of all, who am I, ordinary as I consider myself, to treat Qaddafi of being a “dictator” when you know that nearly 85% of Libyans loved him?

Was he a dictator because Western leaders and their media repeated that “information” over and over again?

And what about Obama who is supported by only 40% of Americans? Is he as well a dictator?

Intricacies of political [and economic] power are often complex.

Having talked to some influential personalities (politicians, journalists, international civil servants, etc.) and understood certain geopolitical realities allowed me to reflect back on a number of issues.

I am not defending African leaders blindly, but I always try to understand the underlying reasons why some of them decide to take certain decisions.

I also try to understand the fury of Western elites and their media on other African leaders. In short, I always try to understand a problem from different angles without letting myself being fooled by whatever mainstream media and [Western] opinion leaders say.

Take the cases of Qaddafi and or Taylor.

I defended Qaddafi because I knew that everything that was being told about him was false.

Was Qaddafi a “saint”? No. Is that a significant reason to support the policy of controlled chaos crafted in the laboratories of NATO and propagated by the media (be reminded that it has caused over 120 000 deaths)? It shouldn’t be.

The same goes about Charles Taylor. Is he a recommendable person? No. Is this why we have to endorse the judicial stupidity that occurred during his trial? No.

John Philpot, a great Canadian lawyer, defender of several cases before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and the ICC, told us about an event that took place during the sentencing of Charles Taylor.

He said:

“There were three judges that day. One of them was a substitute judge who had followed the case from start to finish. On the day of sentencing, the judge then spoke and said that “the conviction of Charles Taylor is proof that the ICC does not apply the law; we have just witnessed again a travesty of justice “… though the judge had not finished speaking, his microphone was abruptly cut off.”

And Mr. Philpot added, “curiously, no media has talked about this incident.“

Carrying on with our discussion, I told the lawyer that very powerful interests controlled ICC. Among many others, for example, there are international NGOs funded by American philanthropist George Soros.

Listening to this, the Canadian lawyer then told me:

“You’re right Patrick; do you know that the case of William Ruto, Kenyan presidential candidate, indicted by the ICC, has been fabricated by Kenyan NGOs?”

All this should raise higher our awareness, dear fellow compatriots and friends. Our reading of events should not be influenced by external agents who have hidden and detrimental agendas forAfrica.

Does the African continent have dictators? Yes it does.[and many]

But to embrace all that is told about some of our leaders by the West, I do not fall for it. For I hold firmly to my intellectual independence.

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